SoMo: The Answers Tour

Music Farm Productions Present

SoMo: The Answers Tour

Carter Reeves, Demarious Cole, Little Stranger

Wed, April 26, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Music Farm Charleston

Charleston, SC

$25 ADV * $30 DOS * VIP available

This event is all ages

$3 Surcharge at the door for those under 21. Cash only.

You will receive an email one week prior to the event with instructions on how to redeem your VIP Experience Package. Tickets are non-transferable and non-refundable, and should not be purchased through third-party sellers. Purchasers found reselling CID packages will have their orders cancelled. To redeem all elements of your VIP order you must present your receipt, picture ID, and credit card at the VIP check-in.  All package elements will be rendered invalid if resold.   CID Entertainment reserves the right to cancel your package for any reason. Questions can be directed to CID at (888) 805 8930 / guestservices@cidentertainment.com

Each ticket purchased here includes a digital copy of SoMo’s album, “The Answers”. An additional email with instructions on how to redeem will be sent. Offer must be redeemed by 7/17/17.

 

SoMo
SoMo
Selling out shows across the country and achieving multiplatinum success by paving a path of his own, SoMo has quietly emerged as R&B’s most successful underground superstar. Now, it’s time for the world to properly meet the Dallas, TX singer and songwriter born Joseph Somers-Morales on his second full-length album, The Answers [Republic Records].

“Over the past two years, I really dialed in all of the different aspects of who I am as a man and tried to represent every facet in the music, production, and lyrics,” he exclaims. “This is the evolution of SoMo. I’ve seen so much of the world and come back to Texas. I’m really telling my story.”

It’s been nothing short of a whirlwind for the artist since the 2014 release of his self-titled debut, SoMo. The record clinched #1 on iTunes Overall Top Albums Chart, and the hit single “Ride” earned an RIAA double-platinum certification. Between sold out headline tours and collaborations with everyone from Jeremih, Ty Dolla $ign, The-Dream, and Trey Songz to Kirko Bangz, Vigiland, Rebel, and Tricky Stewart, SoMo put impressive numbers on the board, selling 393K albums and counting and 4 million singles in addition to amassing 290 million streams. His 2015 mixtape, My Life II, went Top 10 on Billboard’s Top R&B albums chart as he appeared on VH-1’s Big Morning Buzz, The Arsenio Hall Show, and BET’s 106 & Park.

Along the way, he carefully assembled what would become The Answers, recording in Atlanta, Los Angeles, Texas, Toronto, and Florida. SoMo found new influences that encouraged him to embrace his core.

“Listening to artists like Post Malone and Kehlani inspired me to go back and just approach this as who I am,” he admits. “It’s not about fitting in, but rather just being myself.”

During early 2017, he introduced the album with fiery, fun, and flirty “Play” [feat. Maty Noyes], which registered over one million plays in one of weeks’ time. Appropriately arriving for Valentine’s Day, the first single “Just A Man” evokes early nineties R&B with its resounding piano chords and handclaps as SoMo’s voice soars on the confessional hook, “I’m just a man, and you are my world.”

“I like to call it ‘the trendy, timeless SoMo,’” he laughs. “It’s sort of what we got with ‘Ride.’ It doesn’t matter when the song’s released; it works. Obviously, I’ve been somewhat of a ladies’ man. I am a lover and a romantic though. I’ve fallen in love and been madly in love for long periods of time. I wrote that song at Jim Jonsin’s studio in Florida. I remember sitting there for a few hours with the melodies. Then, I dove deep into the words. I wanted to express being apologetic—not just on behalf of myself but on behalf of all men. I’m only human. It’s me making a mistake and owning up to it.”

Then, there’s “Over.” It’s upbeat energy shuffles into another anthemic refrain courtesy of super producer trio Captain Cuts [Walk The Moon, Tove Lo, Halsey, Bebe Rexha]. “I was coming off that ‘Just A Man’ vibe, but it’s a different side, because I’m saying, ‘It’s not my fault’,” he goes on. “She’s the one saying it’s really over, instead.”
Continuing to grow and evolve, the album title The Answers encapsulates his journey thus far. He admits, “It was my search to find the answers inside myself and inside these songs. The whole point is we keep going and searching.”

He’s inviting listeners along for the ride again. “I want people to listen to it in full and feel like they’re leaving a movie afterwards,” SoMo leaves off. “It’s me in the moment.”
Carter Reeves
Carter
Reeves has a spring in his step. Maybe it’s that he’s fresh off a six-year stint selling out shows across the world as half of alt hip-hop duo Aer. Or maybe it’s that his good-mood vibe is exactly what gives his particular brand of pop such an addictive bounce.
“The
thing I kept asking myself was ‘what does this make me feel?” he says. “I’d rather people be having fun, that feels more impactful than having people listen to my music and cry.”
Those
feel-good sounds are exactly what Reeves delivers in his debut solo EP Fresh Fruit. The tracks are sunny but not sugary, a smile in your ear, perfect for grooving out the car window as you drive along the beach. Reeves says he sees music as colors, and Fresh
Fruit is all in a Miami palette: yellows, oranges, pinks.
The
name of the EP comes from Carter’s favorite snacks (“kiwi’s always held it down, but I’m slowly getting into dragonfruit”) but it’s also about an artist coming into his own, ripening into a new phase of his career with music that is both tart and sweet.
Talk
to Me emerged from a creative process that fed off itself. The writing team focused on writing one amazing topline, and the rest of the song-- the lyrics, the melody, the beat-- all came from those first few notes. "That writing process was a first for me,
but definitely not the last," Reeves says.
Reeves
says the good mood vibes fuel his creation. As he played around with the first chords of “Fresh Fruit,” he thought to himself, “this is bright, this is happy, this makes me feel like I’m walking out of my house with a pair of new shoes on.” And so the first
line of the song (“It’s got me feeling like new shoes,”) comes from that feeling. It’s like a bottled happiness that feeds on itself.
That’s
the mood he wants to give to others. Reeves says that over the course of his six years with his old band Aer, he experienced a profound shift in his conception of what music means both to him and to his fans. “It became a job, and then it became a gift,” he
said. That gift is the simplest one of all: making other people feel good.
Reeves
has always thought of music more as a mood-lifter than as a competitive discipline. Raised in Massachusetts, he grew up singing along to Hall & Oates and Fleetwood Mac with his parents, jamming to the car radio and sifting through old CDs and records. His
parents encouraged him to take piano lessons— but he quit. They urged him to join the school chorus, instead, Reeves began playing around with some high school friends, and they started a band. They began to play a few gigs, and then a few more. And out of
that small high school group, Aer was born.
Reeves
started touring with Aer straight out of high school, which means he’s lived on his own for longer than most other 23-year olds. The pressures of doing his own laundry and paying his own bills are routine by now, and behind the youthful falsetto and hipster
man-bun is an old soul. To Reeves, feeling good doesn’t necessarily mean partying till dawn. He often spends his Friday nights finishing whatever nonfiction book he’s been reading lately, although he's just off a Murakami kick.
This
maturity makes him confident in what his music can do— and what it can’t. It takes a truly wise young person to recognize how much he hasn’t experienced yet, and to his credit, Reeves isn’t trying to pretend like he’s endured more pain than he has. “I don’t
want to narrate people’s problems if I haven't been through them myself,” he says. “I’d prefer to be the means to forgetting about those problems.”
He
offers oblivion, not catharsis. “I’m having fun making it, and I want people to have fun listening to it,” he says. “That’s what I want to give to people: a brief moment of forgetting.” As he toured the country with Aer, fans kept coming up to him to tell
him how much their music had helped them through dark times. Reeves realized that music that helps people escape their problems is just as important as music that helps people understand themselves better.
Venue Information:
Music Farm Charleston
32 Ann St.
Charleston, SC, 29403
http://www.musicfarm.com/